Posts

Everything You Could Want to Know About Cellular Shades

When Cellular Shades came on the market they were one of the most innovative window treatment options to be released in a very long time. Their popularity grew because of their effectiveness at reducing energy costs by reducing a home’s total thermal loss. Whether you’re already a cellular shade fan or you’re looking for a reason to buy, this list will tell you everything you could want to know about cellular shades.

They Were Released in 1985

Today’s cellular shade began with the launch of Hunter Douglas’s 1985 Duette Honeycomb Shades. They had the same cellular structure we know now and were advertised as being soft, durable and highly energy efficient. Since then, many other companies have created their own versions of those shades and began referring to them mainly as cellular shades.

Their Design Makes Them Energy Efficient

Most of the heat transfer in your home happens through windows and doors. The individual cells within the shade hold air, creating a barrier between the window surface and the indoor room, making them much more protective than regular shades.

They Come in Several Styles

Close Up Cellular Shade

Cellular shades can come in multiple layers of cells; each extra layer provides more heat and light control inside your home. The layers act as insulation around your windows, keeping out heat in the summer and the warmth in during winter.

Color Makes a Difference

Changing the color of your cellular shade can also affect its ability to reduce heat transfer. The darker the shade, the more light filtering you are going to get inside your home.

Two Shades in One

double cellular shade

Day/Night cordless cellular shades are part light filtering and part blackout. The light filtering part of the shade can be scrunched up to reveal the blackout shade and the blackout shade can be scrunch down to use the light filtering shade. It is the ultimate in window treatment flexibility!

Easy to Maintain

Cellular shades tend to be more durable than horizontal blinds, which can become bent and unsightly. They are typically made from spun lace and bonded polyester that is easy to dust and clean.